Great News for High-Volume Senders: Gmail Postmaster Tools

At Net Atlantic, we’ve always believed in the value of using detailed data and reporting to improve email deliverability and overall ROI. So we were thrilled to see that Google has introduced Gmail Postmaster Tools.

5 Keys to Avoiding a Bad (Sender) Reputation

Your Sender Score, a ReturnPath metric to gauge your reputation as an email sender, is pretty important. It determines whether or not the door to recipient inboxes is open to your email communications and whether or not you’re even a welcome visitor. Heck, it determines whether or not you can even knock on that door as email marketers with poor Sender Scores are often not permitted anywhere near the premises! They either have their emails shunted to a spam folder automatically or recipient ISPs outright refuse the delivery of their messages entirely. Your Sender Score is pretty serious business.

What is a Sender Score And Why Does it Matter?

What is a Sender Score And Why Does it Matter?

For your eye-catching calls-to-action to get clicked on, your carefully crafted and targeted content to get read and engaged with and, heck, your messages even opened altogether, your email needs to first make it into the inbox. And it makes total sense: in order for your email to get interacted with, it needs to get to where it needs to get to in order to be interacted with there. Pretty basic.

But, sadly, there may be times when your mailings don’t get too far past the clicking of the send button, when their handshake with a recipient ISP gets refused outright.

Why is My Email Marked as Spam?

It’s every email marketer’s worst nightmare. They spend days, or even weeks working on a perfect email design, layout, length, and subject line. When they find out from their customer or prospect that the message ended up in their spam folder, it causes extreme frustration.

If you’ve found yourself in this situation, you aren’t alone. Of the billions of emails that are marked as spam on a daily basis, many of them are well-meaning marketers who simply made a few mistakes with their email campaign.

Here are a few of the most common reasons that you are having trouble reaching the inbox of your recipients, and some of the best practices to correct these issues.

The Difference Between a Hard and a Soft Bounce

The Difference Between a Hard and a Soft Bounce

The term “bounce” as it pertains to email analysis is never a good one. Put simply, a bounced email means that your email was not delivered to the intended recipient. There are a number of reasons that a bounce may occur, but they are divided into two broad categories: a hard bounce and a soft bounce.

So what’s the difference between a hard bounce and a soft bounce, and why does it matter for tracking email metrics?

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