You’ve Surveyed Your Audience. Now What?

Analyzing Survey Data

Triggered surveys give you rapid insight into the quality of your customer care, your purchasing process, and ways to improve the user experience. By gathering and analyzing data and feedback from your customers (in real-time, no less), you learn more about them and gain valuable insight as to how you might optimize your email marketing programs to better suit them. When you can identify your prospects’ and customers’ needs and pain points, you can address them more quickly and more accurately.

Don’t Read Minds. Use a Survey

Don't Read Minds. Use A Survey

If you want to know how to increase your business, just ask your customers. Why waste time guessing? Just ask. In particular, inquire about what it is your customers expect from you, what features of your product or service they most enjoy, what they think about your customer service, and what exactly you could be improving. Put simply, you possess the ability to track customer satisfaction and dissatisfaction directly by surveying your customers. Plus, the fact that you, as a business, are expressing a desire to hear them out in order to improve their experience with you will always sit favorably with customers.

Transforming your data into customer intelligence

Customer data is one of a company’s greatest assets. Yet, this data is often underutilized. Learning about your customers and using that behavioral and transactional data to create more relevant and meaningful customer communications is the key to building and maintaining strong customer relationships.

Email marketing lends itself to tracking so marketers can gain a real-time sense of how well a campaign is performing, and pinpoint problems or areas that need improvement. The challenge a lot of marketers face is how to make sense of all the data and use it effectively. Organizing the data you accumulate from your email campaigns—and making sense if it all—can be daunting. However, developing a better understanding of customer behaviors, attitudes, and preferences enables more effective and relevant messaging.

Email intelligence tactics can help you take your marketing to the next level. For example:

• Identify and segment newly married from empty nesters (these consumers are at distinct phases in their lives)

• Segment by geography (don’t advertise Red Sox baseball caps to New York residents)

• Profile the characteristics of your most profitable customers (buys frequently, high-volume)

• Focus your sales efforts on the leads that meet qualifying criteria (demographics, firmographics)

Harness customer data to improve relevancy

Differentiate customers, not just products

Moving into the New Year, marketers will need to make better use of customer data to engage and drive more relevant communications. By gathering insight about customers, marketers can begin to have more meaningful interactions through rich and deep customer intelligence.

Business intelligence data offers immense opportunity to better serve and engage customers. Expanding the customer profile with a combination of transactional and behavioral interaction data collected across multiple channels, empowers marketers to create highly targeted automated messaging. Start by tracking behavioral interactions, such as purchase history, clicks in your emails, and website activity. Use this data to segment your list and create actionable offers that are more integrated, personalized, and relevant across all your marketing activities.

Moving Beyond Segmentation

5 Ways to Segment Your Email List

Customer intelligence and behavioral profiling for a more focused email marketing campaign

Last week I discussed tapping into rich subscriber data to deliver a unique customer experience. Grouping customers into one catch-all segment no longer works. A highly targeted email marketing strategy means a higher campaign conversion rate.

When it comes to their online marketing strategies, marketers must increasingly rely on technology to deliver more relevant messages to the right person at the right time.

Don’t Mistarget Your Marketing Efforts

Don’t Mistarget Your Marketing Efforts

To be successful, marketers need to send the right message to the right customer at the right time. According to a 2011 study by Blue Research, if you personalize the experience between you and your subscribers, they are 50 percent more likely to return to your site, and 40 percent more likely to recommend you to others.

Tap into rich subscriber data to deliver unique customer experience.

Tapping your subscriber data is a key component of an effective email marketing program. Subscriber data can come from a variety of sources—observed web behavior, purchase data, stated preferences, CRM notes, social, email, surveys and more. Analyze this information and use insights gleaned (e.g., sentiment, demographics, individual influence, behavior) to create engaging customer experiences that build stronger, more intimate relationships and foster long-term loyalty.

The Social Conversation: It’s About Listening

Late last year, Dell computer opened its Social Media Listening Command Center at their headquarters outside of Austin, Texas. The listening room is just one of many social media marketing strategies that Dell is using. The company has a series of Facebook pages with user-generated content promoting its products; formal ways to incorporate customer-based suggestions into future product features; and a number of Twitter accounts they use to broadcast daily deals.

Other companies using social media sites like Twitter for business include Southwest Airlines who uses Twitter to inform their customers about deals, and Comcast who uses Twitter to resolve customer service issues.