Top Takeaways from the Email Evolution Conference 2013

Mobile Marketing was front and center at the DMA’s Email Evolution Conference.  Speakers and roundtable discussions were buzzing about what the increase in mobile usage means to email marketers. And it is easy to understand why:

  • 62% are using their smartphone every day and 80% don’t leave home without them.
  • Mobile email will account for 15 to 65% of email opens, depending on your target audience, product and email type.
  • Stats say 42% of email is now opened on a mobile device.
  • 43% of mobile email users check email four or more times per day.

Believe it or not, your customers are mobile!  Now is the time to think about a mobile strategy around your marketing efforts for social, Web and email in order to ensure success.

Behavioral Marketing: Subscribers Demand More Personalized Content

Differentiate customers, not just products

Targeting tactics should be a key component of your marketing strategy

Behavioral targeting starts with understanding who your target audience is, what they’re interested in and what their needs are. Crafting your email with their needs in mind will help keep them engaged.

Identifying a target market’s pain points and recognizing differences between groups of customers, is at the heart of marketing. What you think is relevant and what a prospect or customer finds relevant may be two different things.

Harness customer data to improve relevancy

Differentiate customers, not just products

Moving into the New Year, marketers will need to make better use of customer data to engage and drive more relevant communications. By gathering insight about customers, marketers can begin to have more meaningful interactions through rich and deep customer intelligence.

Business intelligence data offers immense opportunity to better serve and engage customers. Expanding the customer profile with a combination of transactional and behavioral interaction data collected across multiple channels, empowers marketers to create highly targeted automated messaging. Start by tracking behavioral interactions, such as purchase history, clicks in your emails, and website activity. Use this data to segment your list and create actionable offers that are more integrated, personalized, and relevant across all your marketing activities.

Hotelier Email Marketing Challenges & Solutions [Post 4 of 5]

Email marketing is an excellent tool for hoteliers to stay in touch with their guests and prospects. Travel related email campaigns retain a loyal audience and create direct revenue opportunities with past, present, and future customers. In this five part blog series we will address common challenges hoteliers face and explore how email marketing is the most effective solution to meet these challenges.

Today’s blog post highlights how transactional or “service” emails can be turned into revenue opportunities. Whether you are new to email marketing or are looking to refine your email campaigns, learn how you can use email to drive action and increase profits.

Hotelier Email Marketing Challenges & Solutions [Post 3 of 5]

Email marketing is an excellent tool for hoteliers to stay in touch with their guests and prospects. Travel related email campaigns retain a loyal audience and create direct revenue opportunities with past, present, and future customers. In this five part blog series we will address common challenges hoteliers face and explore how email marketing is the most effective solution to meet these challenges.

Today’s blog post highlights how hotel marketers can consolidate data to deliver one-to-one messages in real-time. Whether you are new to email marketing or are looking to refine your email campaigns, learn how you can use email to drive action and increase profits.

Hotelier Email Marketing Challenges & Solutions [Post 1 of 5]

Email marketing is an excellent tool for hoteliers to stay in touch with their guests and prospects. Travel related email campaigns retain a loyal audience and create direct revenue opportunities with past, present, and future customers. In this five part blog series we will address common marketing challenges hoteliers face and explore how email is still the most effective solution to meet these challenges.

Today’s blog post highlights how email marketing can help hoteliers improve hotel sales through higher room bookings. Whether you are new to email marketing or are looking to refine your email campaigns, learn how you can use email to drive action and increase profits.

Drive Engagement: Automate Your Lead Nurture Strategy

When creating your lead nurturing campaign it’s important that you carefully plan the flow of your emails to ensure that your overall campaign guides your leads through the funnel. Implement automatically triggered campaigns (a series of automated emails called a “drip” campaign) that deliver consistent brand messages at specified time intervals and when leads reach certain milestones. In a long sales cycle, messages need to be more informative and not a sales pitch. Offer them something of value (webinars, eBooks, white papers, articles, free reports, blog posts, etc.).

Here are five essential elements of an effective lead nurturing campaign:

Create a Gauntlet Welcome Series to Retain New Leads

Seeing your email list grow is a great feeling. You’ve put in hard work to get quality leads and now they’ll stick around and buy your products or services, right? Not necessarily!

Once you’ve got a captive audience, you need to make them want to stay on your email marketing list. A great way to do that is to create a multi-part gauntlet welcome series to help new leads familiarize themselves with your company and to set expectations for future communications.

Every business is different and depending on how often you send emails, you might do a one-part series or a five-part series… or something in between! Regardless of how many emails your gauntlet encompasses, there are some problems you may encounter and some solutions that will help make it successful.

Become a Trusted Source: Nurture Your Leads

Lead nurturing is the process an inquiry goes through once it is received by your company. This process has the goal of converting as many of your leads into qualified prospects as possible. Depending on your business model this process could also result in immediate sales. With an intelligent and automated lead nurturing program in place companies can see a huge return on investment.

An effective lead nurturing campaign can increase the number of qualified prospects in your pipeline and decrease the time a possible client spends in a sales cycle. But even more important than this, a great nurture program can demonstrate to your potential customer base that you are trusted source of information. Once a prospect views you as a valuable source of information you have deepened your relationship with that potential customer.  If you have a deeper relationship with your customer from the beginning, a solid foundation has been set and you will likely be able to retain that client for a longer period of time.

Successfully integrating a nurture campaign into your email marketing efforts takes some planning. You don’t want to just start pushing material out to your leads. You want to serve them timely information. Each email should be seen as a way to provide your prospects with valuable insight, not just as an opportunity to influence their buying decision. In return this train of thought could result in lasting relationship with your buyers. Reports have shown that acquiring a new customer is 6 to 7 times more expensive then retaining an existing customer.

1 comment on “The New York Times Email Mistake: Can It Happen To You?”

The New York Times Email Mistake: Can It Happen To You?

By now you probably know about the New York Times’ little email error on Wednesday, December 27. But if you don’t, here’s the nutshell: The Times sent a ‘Cancellation’ email to 8.6 million people, presumably every single one of their online email subscribers. The email was meant only for those who actually subscribe to the paper’s home delivery service.

First the Times claimed it was spam, then blamed their email service provider Epsilon, and finally fessed up; The Times did it themselves.

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