7 tips for writing great welcome emails

What do you do when someone new subscribes to your email list?

If you’re like most organizations, you send them an automated “thanks for subscribing” message and leave it at that. At a bare minimum, you should be doing this, so that new subscribers know you received their request to opt in. However, if this is all you’re doing, you’re missing a great opportunity to start building a strong relationship with your new subscriber right away. We recommend going the extra mile to welcome them to your community of subscribers, whether it’s through a single email or a series of automated messages over a period of days or weeks.

You can use a welcome series to thank your subscriber for joining your list, make them aware of other ways to stay in touch (via your social networks, for example), offer them new subscriber discounts or coupons, incentivize them to tell their friends about you, or all of the above. It doesn’t matter which of these you choose, but it does matter how you execute.

Turn the limitations of animated GIFs into an opportunity

A member of our graphic design team here at NetAtlantic recently received this email at one of his personal email addresses:

Turn the limitations of animated GIFs into an opportunity

You can’t tell from the image above, but it’s made up of several of animated gif images, none of which were animating when he opened the email in his Yahoo account. (When viewed through a Web mail client, the image looks like this:  http://cache2.cv47.net/wpm/241/ContentUploads/UploadedContent_9186/images/4pizzas_cropped.gif).

How to build great relationships with dialogue marketing

You’ve probably heard a lot about “joining the conversation” and “building relationships” in the context of social media, but have you considered how these ideas could apply to your email marketing strategy? It might be time to give it some serious thought.

Periodic emails updating your subscribers about what you and/or your organization have going on may no longer be enough to get you the results you want. You need to start engaging your customers and prospects in an ongoing dialogue in order to create lasting relationships.

Win the Attention of Undecided Prospects

Email marketing is still one of the most effective channels to nurture prospects due to its low cost, and the willingness of buyers to receive email from companies with whom they already have some kind of relationship. According to DemandGen Report, nurtured leads produce, on average, a 20% increase in sales opportunities versus non-nurtured leads. The following lead nurturing best practices will help you build relationships with your prospects:

  • Get their permission. Before sending marketing messages to your prospects, be sure to ask for their explicit permission, preferably via double opt-in, so they do not see it as unsolicited email or spam. This shows respect by giving your prospects a choice, which will set the tone for relationship building and partnership. The success of your email marketing campaign depends on this more than anything else.
  • Automate your lead nurture strategy. Implement automatically triggered campaigns (a series of automated emails called a “drip” campaign) that deliver consistent brand messages at specified time intervals and when leads reach certain milestones. Drip marketing is a strategy that will help you keep your company fresh in your recipients’ minds until they’re ready to buy. Over time, as prospects respond, you’ll learn more about their needs and interests.

Behavioral Marketing: Subscribers Demand More Personalized Content

Differentiate customers, not just products

Targeting tactics should be a key component of your marketing strategy

Behavioral targeting starts with understanding who your target audience is, what they’re interested in and what their needs are. Crafting your email with their needs in mind will help keep them engaged.

Identifying a target market’s pain points and recognizing differences between groups of customers, is at the heart of marketing. What you think is relevant and what a prospect or customer finds relevant may be two different things.

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